Ian de Terte

PhD, PGDipClinPsych

Senior Lecturer/Clinical Psychologist

Dr de Terte is a clinical psychologist (registration number 90-2594) and senior lecturer in clinical psychology (US equivalent: Associate Professor) at Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand. He has research interests in the following areas: (1) psychological resilience/wellbeing, which he views from a multidimensional viewpoint that includes the constructs of optimism, social support, self-care, posttraumatic growth, prevention strategies, stigma, sports participation, and survival behaviour. In addition, he draws on the performance psychology literature, such as imagery, to enhance a person’s resilience or wellbeing; (2) traumatic stress, in particular, he is interested in posttraumatic stress disorder, burnout/reactive depression, cumulative trauma, and secondary traumatic stress/vicarious trauma; and (3) high-risk occupations (e.g., police officers, fire-fighters, and military personnel). The research methodologies that he utilises are single-case design, moderation/mediation analysis, and meta-analysis. Dr de Terte is on four editorial boards: Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy; Disability and Rehabilitation; Australasian Journal of Disaster and Trauma Studies; and the Journal of Loss and Trauma: International Perspectives on Stress and Coping. He is a member of the New Zealand Psychological Society (including the Institute of Clinical Psychology); and the New Zealand Association of Positive Psychology. Dr de Terte’s clinical interests are directly transferable from his research interests. Dr de Terte has been fortunate to be involved in clinical or research work in some remote locations such as Phuket, Pitcairn Island, and Dubai. In his “previous life” he was a police detective with the New Zealand Police.

Links:

School of Psychology, Massey University

New Zealand Psychological Society

Dr de Terte's Publications on Google Scholar 

Contact Details:           

M: (+64) 021-779-241

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